SLIDER

WELCOME

1111
Self care, skin care,
& nurturing Mother Nature.

Read more here

Living life with good intention, loving with soul, and consuming with a conscience

Montessori Living: What it is and How we're doing it



I don't post a great deal about being a parent on here because wow well, it's a ride. As a first time mother, I'm very much just muddling along and just taking each day as it comes and let's be real - everyone likes to try and dish out unsolicited parenting advice! This has made me a little reluctant to share what we're doing as a new family because I have zero tolerance for others telling me how to parent (and I would hope if I ever tried to do the same with others that they would also shoot me down and tell me to stop!).

That being said however, there is a "philosophy" that I've grown very involved in and have been practicing at home that I want to share more of on both this blog and my Instagram because at the end of the day, it's part of my lifestyle and I found online resources *so* beneficial and educational when I first became interested in the Montessori lifestyle.

So I figured to kick-start discussing Montessori living here on NB, the best place to start was explaining briefly what it is, how we've introduced to our home so far, and also our plans for the future. This is not me saying we have this parenting thing on lock-down and that there's a right or wrong way to parent. The whole role and job of a parent is completely subjective and has to work for you and your child, family, lifestyle, home etc. This is simply me sharing what we're doing because I find it really interesting and I'm loving learning more and more as my baby gets older!

I also wanted to explain as best I can what Montessori theory actually involves as it seems to be becoming a trendy thing on Instagram in terms of the physical aspects (such as aesthetically pleasing, almost minimalist toys) but, it's so much more beyond that - that aspect of it is the least important part by a long stretch!

What is Montessori?
What started as an educational method in schools thanks to research by Maria Montessori in the 20th century, Montessori learning has now seeped into homes and has become a lifestyle and parenting technique also. Maria Montessori was the first female Italian doctor and she believed that a human infant is born incomplete and that they themselves need to finish their own formation. This construction of ones own self lasts from birth to adulthood (24 years old to be exact) as she believed that we need to construct our own brains with guidance until we reach maturity at the age of 24. From her research and observing children, she designed a school theory based on appealing to children's nature rather than fighting it.

She found that children learned well through moving and experiencing their learning rather than sitting listening to a teacher. She believed that children need a level of flexibility that helps them thrive rather than inhibits them. We all learn and develop our intelligence through our five senses and especially for children, the link between the hand and the brain is vital to this learning as it's how all babies develop in their early years (think about babies learning to hold rattles, pick up food, hold cups, then learning to write as they grow older). By giving children this zone of flexibility with their learning, you are helping them gain independence from a young age and supporting them to shape their own selves and also gives them the opportunity to develop self evaluation which is such a beneficial personal skill for anyone (especially us adults!).



As you're trying to create this air of independence and practicality for a child, a Montessori home ideally has child-sized furniture so your child can do as much as they can for themselves (from preparing their own food to eating at the table, putting themselves to bed etc.) and also presents toys and activities that are the right level of "challenging" for their developmental stage.

The role of the parent is much the same as a teacher in a Montessori school: you are more of an overseer or a guide than you are someone who intervenes. You allow your child freedom within boundaries you've set and help them flourish in their own way by objectively observing and supporting their preferences and opinions without interjecting or overshadowing them with your own. For example, in a Montessori school, a teacher may let a child choose between working on languages or maths - they have those two options to choose between - giving them some freedom and flexibility but, it is still within boundaries. That child then may have the option to work at a desk and chair or sit on the floor. Again, it's all about choice and basically, going with your child's flow!

How we're doing it at home
When I first became interested in the Montessori method, Teddy was already one month old and I worried it was too late to put a lot of it in place but, you really can start implementing it whenever. The more I read about it, the more I realised that the majority of it were things that Matt and I were already naturally doing as parents so it seemed like a positive thing to further explore when it aligned well with our "parenting style" already.

As Teddy is currently only 6 months old, a lot of elements of Montessori aren't applicable yet (such as the child-sized furniture and the taking part in practical activities) but, there's a lot we have already been doing with him since he was a one month old. One of the best things we've done thus far - that isn't strictly Montessori at all and is something I think all parents encourage and do naturally! - is to develop his language.

I talk to Teddy all day and about everything. I tell him what our daily plans and to-do list are each morning, I tell him I'm now applying his moisturiser for his eczema, I explain that that bus that drove past the window we're looking out of is taking people to work or college or school... It may sound so incredibly obvious and something we all do as it is but, by talking to your baby you're not only developing their language skills and their understanding of different sounds but also preparing them for practical life once they're a little bit older. Singing and reading aloud to him is something we also do and the one thing I will always stress to other parents is that babies are never too young to read!



We have also used various toys that are suited to Teddy's needs and next level of challenge based on observing what he can and can't do. From birth to 6 months, so so much changes and develops in a baby and we've wanted to encourage and support those changes as much as possible. For example, once he started developing his ability to grasp things, we ensured he had toys that were the right size and different shapes to help train this skill and help him enjoy playing but also meet some level of challenge by having to work out how to hold different shapes and sizes of toys/rattles.

A big part of the Montessori method is to provide children with toys and activities which don't do the entertaining for them - they have to entertain themselves. Teddy doesn't have any electronic toys with flashing lights, screens etc. (unless it's sensory play related) purely because he doesn't need them. Again, children having these is no problem but, we don't have them to try and encourage him to concentrate on an activity for a longer time. He only ever has the choice of 3 or 4 toys at any given time to not overwhelm him and also to encourage this ability to concentrate on one thing at a time. This has resulted in him being happy to play independently for extended periods even as a young baby and is helping him master certain skills.

Positive discipline is central to the Montessori method in the sense that the relationship between parent and child is one based on respect and a "we are a team" mentality. Obviously Teddy is still very young for most aspects of discipline but, simple things like if I'm speaking to Matt and Teddy starts whining, I will turn to him and say "Mammy is talking to Daddy right now. You can talk to me in a minute". By doing this, he has already started to understand how conversations work and that you need to remain quiet to let the other person speak and vice versa. Even at 6 months, he is starting to understanding what interrupting is and how it hinders a conversation rather than helps it develop.

As he has started baby-led weaning, if he starts playing with his food - not in an investigative way but more of a just throwing it around way! - I will say "You must be finished with your dinner because you're playing with it now so I will tidy it away" and I can then gauge by response whether or not he has actually finished. These small things will help just create routine and understanding for him as a toddler as he will be used to these small expectations already.

Lastly, over the past month I have started to give Teddy choices. Only small and he probably has no rhyme or reason behind them but, every morning when he gets dressed, I present him with two tops and say "Which one? The grey stripy one? Or the beige one with the bears on it?" or "Green socks or brown socks?". Some people might think it's silly to allow a 6 month old to choose things in this way but, I want him to feel he has a choice once that independence and desire to dress himself etc. kicks in. This way means he's set up to feel that he always can have freedom to choose, within the boundaries laid out for him.

Of course there are other small things that we are doing day-to-day to help build up to when he is a toddler and a lot of the method really comes into play but, for now, we're really happy with how the Montessori method slots into our lifestyle and "parenting style". I will be sharing more about Teddy's toys, developmental stages, and how his Montessori nursery is decorated/laid out so if you're interested in finding out more, keep your eyes peeled for those posts soon!


Follow me on Bloglovin'
Twitter & Instagram xo

2 comments

Hannah said...

Really enjoyed this post! I'm interested in aspects of the Montessori method and this has explained the foundations really well, thank you.
Also I love reading about parenting as I find it fascinating how everyone is different. But it doesn't come across as telling others how to parent, just people sharing their own version of winging it 😹 xx

Unknown said...

Amy I really enjoyed reading this as it is something close to heart...Teddy is a very lucky little boy to have parents who are so open to this kind of learning.. 💗🐻

© Northern Blood • Theme by Maira G.