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Living life with good intention, loving with soul, and consuming with a conscience

Low Waste Eco-friendly Transitioning Tips: At Home



Being more environmentally conscious seemed to gain traction and popularity with reusable straws, tote bags, and reusable coffee cups and bottles and whilst there's definitely some ways in which you can be more eco-friendly on the go, there's *so* many ways you can be more low waste at home that will positively impact the environment too. Over the past few months, I've been sharing ways in which you can be more low waste and eco-friendly and trying my best to demonstrate just how easy it can be to make some changes to your everyday life. So here's some ways you can do just that but this time, we're focusing on what you can switch-up at home:

Reusable cloths and old fabrics:
Something that I'm sure a lot of us do already is use cloths that we wash and use again when doing various bits of housework. Cloths are cheap and obviously better for the environment as you can use them until they literally fall apart. I'm sure I don't really need to mention it here but, using cleaning wipes for example can be so detrimental to the environment and let's be honest - they're not particularly cost-effective either as they are single use items. If you're running low on cloths and don't want to/can't buy any new ones, cutting up old fabrics such as old t-shirts are always a great way to repurpose some items for a little longer (and FYI, t-shirt rags are often pretty darn good for dusting cloths - particularly on mirrors!).

I personally have also enjoyed using old socks which have holes in as dusting or cleaning mitts or old flannels/muslin cloths which are too old and grubby to continue to use for skincare!

If you typically use paper towels or kitchen roll often, either try using rags or fabric cloths instead or try out bamboo kitchen roll. It can be used multiple times before it needs to be thrown away and even then, it will degrade much faster than the "paper" alternatives we're all familiar with.



Get to grips with your local recycling:
Obviously recycling is a step to a more eco-friendly lifestyle but, it's important that you're clear on how to actually recycle. Check out your local council's website to get to grips with how your local area recycles as not each county or even each town recycles in the same way (for example, I used to live in Winchester and glass wasn't collected. I moved 10 minutes away to a neighbouring town and it is now recycled separately to other recycling).

Not only is it just handy to know your local recycling guidelines, it's also great to just educate yourself on recycling in general. Many items that you'd assume can be recycled (such as paper straws, sticky notes, and some receipts just to name a few) can't actually be recycled due to contamination or parts of them being difficult to break down. Knowing this sort of thing might help you with making decisions such as refusing a paper copy of receipt on your next in-store purchase but will also make your recycling journey more streamline and effective.

Use storage you already have:
I talked about how handy glass jars can be in a previous post so naturally, I'm going to talk about them again here! Whether it's an old jam jar or a passata jar, keeping them once they've been used up can help you reduce how much single-use or non-eco-friendly items you use. A jar is just as good as keeping half an avocado fresh as cling film, it just means it can be washed out and used time and time again without negatively impacting the planet.

Almost every household has some tupperware floating around and my oh my, is it a godsend. People sometimes make the mistake of getting rid of things like tupperware when they switch to being more eco-friendly because it's often made from plastic but please don't get rid of what you already have - that goes against the whole idea of being more zero waste! Instead just put it to good use and reap the benefits; the planet will thank you too!



Invest in other short-term food storage:
If you're someone who needs to use things like food bags or currently relies on cling film a great deal, buying beeswax wraps can be a more eco-friendly option for you as can resusable food bags. If buying new items such as these are out of the question for you, simply washing out generic "single-use" food bags to try and get as many uses out of them as possible is also just a small way you can make less of an impact.

Reduce your food waste:
A biggie that we can all try to implement (myself included) is trying to produce less food waste. It's easy to go food shopping and over buy or be sucked into deals such as a huge sack of potatoes being the same price as the two individual potatoes you actually intended to buy and then those excess items sit in our cupboards, fridges, and freezers, taking up space and often going off and rotting before we get a chance to use them. I talked about this in a lot more detail here, but meal planning, only buying what you need, and composting if you can can all be ways to be more low waste.

Composting is a great free and easy option if you have a garden you like to care for but don't fret if you don't - you can always ask your local council for a composting bin if your area supplies them or you can keep it in a air-tight container in your freezer and take it to a local drop-off bin if you have one!

Buy biodegradable options instead:
Whether it's bamboo toothbrushes or wooden scrubbers for your dishes, there's plenty of biodegradable options out there to replace plastic items that you usually need to repurchase over time. I've been a huge advocate of bamboo toothbrushes for some time but, after learning about how damaging sponges can be in terms of micro plastics, switching to a biodegradable cleaning pad, brush, or dish loofa is one of my next swaps to make.



Make your own cleaning products:
Whilst we're on the topic of cleaning, many cleaners we typically buy are harmful to the environment due to their plastic packaging and the chemicals in them. If you're a regular Northern Blood reader, you will already know how much I support making your own cleaning products - it's much easier than you think as you only need a few items which can be bought in bulk. By making your own cleaners, you're not only saving money, but you're also using eco-friendly products that don't have harsh chemicals in. That's a win win for the ocean but also for your lungs and skin!

If DIY-ing your own cleaning agents isn't your cup of tea, making more conscious choices when shopping for your cleaning products is also a step in the right direction. Get out of the habit of thinking you need a million different cleaners because you simply don't. Do some research on which brands are things like cruelty free, vegan, and chemical-free. Buy from the brands who offer refill options either in store or allow you to bulk buy and refill bottles you've already purchased from them. Think about everything from your washing up liquid dish soap to your laundry detergent. It's an area we can often overlook due to the necessity of these items but even a small change can make all the difference.

Buy organic and sustainable materials & take care of what you own:
I've talked in detail about how good it is to buy natural fibres instead of synthetic fibres when it comes to fashion but, why stop there? Think about things like blankets, your bedding, cushion covers... all of these items will no doubt end up in your washing machine one day and when they do, are they going to release micro plastics into the water that end up in the ocean? Possibly - especially those exclusively synthetic materials. When you're buying items around the home in future, consider what they're made of before purchasing, but if you already own a lot of synthetic materials - don't fret! Buying a guppy friend which catches the micro plastics in your laundry can be a life saver.

Another point that I've mentioned before in relation to fashion that I just want to mention again here to really drive the message home is to take care of what you already own. If your items have label instructions for washing or storage actually pay attention to them and follow them! This will mean you will get the most out of your items and therefore have to replace them less and potentially, not at all. This will help you buy less and use things for longer which is one of the simplest ways you can be more low waste.



Repair what you can and shop secondhand:
If there's a tear in something - patch it up. If there's a scratch on a table - don't just get rid of it; research if you can fix it or disguise it somehow. We have all been brought up in a "just buy a new one" culture when things aren't quite perfect and it's just so unnecessary. Not only does having a more "I'll try to fix it" approach mean you get the most out of items ranging from your clothing to a wardrobe to an electronic device, it also means you can build up your own skill set because you might have to learn something new. This can help you salvage things in the future and save you money too!

As for buying secondhand, y'all know that I'm an advocate of that in every capacity but, using things like Facebook Marketplace, buy and sell pages, Gumtree etc. are a great way to locally source secondhand furniture, electronics, equipment, tools etc. that others no longer need or want and that you do. It's cheaper, helps out others, and stops you directly buying from the source.

Go green with your energy:
The last pointer I'm going to mention here (that will also save you some dosh), is to switch to a green or eco-friendly energy provider. This is something we only recently did but my oh my, do I feel better for it. I'm not going to go into too much detail here about green energy providers - namely because I'm going to talk about them in more detail in the 'tech' post in this series - but generally speaking they're better for the environment and usually have really good deals/cost you less in the long term.

Not only can you switch providers but think about how you consume energy in your home in general. Simple things such as having shorter showers, using eco settings on appliances, turning lights off in rooms you're not using, and making sure electronics are completely turned off and not left on standby can cut your bill and your footprint. Even only filling your kettle with as much water as you actually need rather than completely filling it will help too!


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3 comments

Sophie said...

We've worked so hard this year to try and reduce our waste and recycling, its crazy how much you use!

I know this might sound obvious but I go round and turn all the plugs off before I leave for work, it saves sooo much on electric!

Sophie
www.thecoffeelawdiary.blogspot.com

Envy said...

My mom raised me with lessons in sustainability, although they were intended as lessons in frugality at the time, hahaha. Many of the things on this list are things I used to do as a kid with my mom, like cutting up old shirts so she could use them to clean the house. Some other things I still need to work on, like green energy. Sadly, a lot of what is sold as green energy here in the Netherlands is actually gray. My country buys the rights to excess green energy from Norway, so even if I switch to a green provider I still am supporting the fossil fuel industry :(

x Envy
Lost in Translation

Margarida said...

I am trying to live as ethically and sustainably as possible. These tips are great, thank you so much for sharing it.

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